Posts

SERMON: The Unbelief of the Sadducees | Mark 12:18–27

Image
The Unbelief of the Sadducees | Mark 12:18–27
Shaun Marksbury | Grace Bible Church
Sunday Morning Service | November 4, 2018

When skeptics come to attack biblical beliefs, we need not feel intimated, regardless of their intellectual prowess.  In this encounter with the Sadducees, Jesus demonstrates the underlying problems with such attacks.  He says they stray like sheep because they don't know the Scripture or the power of God.  His answers help us as we think through the implications of like challenges in our lives.

Audio:

Video:

Manuscript (PDF): We read today about yet another group approaching to accost Jesus: the Sadducees.  They’re sent from the chief priests for a third wave of questioning, hoping to trap Him in a statement (cf. 11:27; 12:13).  This wealthy group of men included the chief priests and most of Jerusalem’s ruling council.  The Reformation Study Bible notes, “Their name probably derives from Zadok, David’s high priest (2 Sam. 8:17; 1 Chr. 15:11; 29:22) and appointe…

The Second Greatest Commandment | Mark 12:28–34

Image
We’re continuing to examine a question Jesus was asked by a scribe.His question is, “What commandment is the foremost of all?” (v. 28), and we saw Jesus’s response yesterday.Unprompted, Jesus went on to list the second in v. 31.What do we learn?
This is the second, not the second and third.One of the most common misconceptions about this command is that it’s actually two commands.The reasoning goes that you cannot love a neighbor “as yourself” if you do not love yourself, so Jesus is commanding that you must love yourself and your neighbor.However, Jesus gives no indication that this command contains a hidden one, nor does Scripture ever command someone to self-love.
The second command is to love one’s neighbor instead.This command sums up the last six commandments, the ones which either positively or negatively tell us to deny ourselves and care for others (our parents, spouses, or neighbors).When James talks about this command, he explains that we can’t show partiality, commit adulte…

The Greatest Commandment | Mark 12:28–34

Image
Since Mark 11:27, Jesus has been accosted by questions in the temple.One now comes from a scribe, an expert in the Law of Moses.He was one from the Pharisees, meaning he would have been pleased with Jesus’s response to the Sadducees, but he came to Jesus to test Him (cf. Mt 22:34–35).Setting aside this scribe’s motives for now, this question grants us an invaluable lesson on righteous living, which we will examine today and tomorrow.
The greatest commandment is knowing God.In vv. 29–30, Jesus quotes from Deuteronomy 6:4–5, a passage known as the Shema (Hebrew for “hear”).This important passage became a creed devout Jews recited every morning and evening.
The command starts by defining Who He is.First, a believer must see Him with the possessive—“The Lord our God”—not just the God of the Bible or of the forefathers.Second, a believer must understand that He “is one Lord”—meaning unique, for “there is no one else besides Him” (v. 32).This can only explain the Triune God of Scripture—thr…

SERMON: The Christian View of Government | Mark 12:13–17

Image
The Christian View of Government | Mark 12:13–17
Shaun Marksbury | Grace Bible Church
Sunday Morning Service | October 28, 2018

As believers, we continually struggle with our responsibility to government.  Our Lord lived under two unjust governments—a religious one that failed in its job to recognize the Messiah, and a political one that literally crucified its opponents.  Yet, Jesus models how a Christian is to live under such regimes and gives us clear instruction in this text.

Audio:

Video:

Manuscript (PDF):
As believers, we continually struggle with our responsibility to government.The question has become more pressing as Christian business owners have started suffering for their workplace convictions, whether they be bakers, photographers, etc.Moreover, it seems that we’re entering an era where simply having Christian beliefs can threaten employment—thankfully, the City of Atlanta recently lost their case where they defended firing their distinguished fire chief for his views on marri…

That’s Why They Were So Sad, You See | Mark 12:18–27

Image
We read today about yet another group approaching to accost Jesus: the Sadducees.They’re sent from the chief priests for a third wave of questioning, hoping to trap Him in a statement (cf. 11:27; 12:13).This wealthy group of men included the chief priests and much of Jerusalem’s ruling council.
Even wielding great influence in Jewish religious life, the beliefs of the Sadducees would be akin to theological liberalism today.They only held the books of Moses as authoritative, and not even that.They also didn’t believe in the resurrection (v. 18) nor in the existence of angels, a future judgment, or the immortality of the soul (cf. Acts 23:6–8).
As such, this hypothetical scenario of a woman marrying seven husbands is, of course, a challenge to Jesus.If He’s stymied, they believe they would prove themselves more intelligent than Jesus while also demonstrating how absurd it is to believe in the resurrection.
However, such challenges demonstrate a lack of knowledge of Scripture.Jesus demon…

SERMON: Wicked Vine-Growers and a Sovereign Lord | Mark 12:1–12

Image
Wicked Vine-Growers and a Sovereign Lord | Mark 12:1–12
Shaun Marksbury | Grace Bible Church
Sunday Morning Service | October 14, 2018

We know God is patient, though we sometimes fail to appreciate just how patient.  Still, there comes a moment when even His patience comes to an end.  In this parable, we're warned by the example of the Jewish leadership to repent while there's still time.

Audio: Video:

Manuscript (PDF):

This is perhaps Wednesday of the passion week.Remember that, in the preceding chapter, Jesus was walking in the wide courtyard of the temple and teaching the people gathered there.The chief priests, scribes, and elders chose that moment to accost Jesus publicly and challenge His authority.He deftly answered their questioning with a question of His own that they refused to answer.With this parable, as well as the parable of the two sons (cf. Mt 21:28–32) and the prophecy chief cornerstone, He turns the challenge back on them, prompting their retreat.
As we read it to…